What Do Huckleberries Taste Like? Do Huckleberries Taste Good?

There aren’t many who do not like berries. They are flavorful, colorful, and add great delight to different meals, thanks to their versatility.

And what else makes them a great choice? Well, they are rich in antioxidants and phytonutrients, which are essential for our health.

Various berries have different tastes and varying nutrient levels. We are familiar with the common ones, but what about Huckleberries?

How do they taste? Some say they taste a lot like blueberries while they are blue or purple.

But the truth is huckleberries taste different at every stage of growth.

What is Huckleberries?

Huckleberries are small and round edible berries birthing from Ericaceae, a flowering plant. They resemble the blueberries in look and flavor.

Many people in the US refer to them as blueberries and blueberries as huckleberries.

But in North America, they go solely by the name, Huckleberries or Hurtleberries.

According to Bernadine Strik, a professor and leader of NWREC Berry Crops Research, huckleberries are akin to blueberries but are from a different genus.

Their hues vary from red to blue to dark purple, based on their species. They are usually mall and measure up to 10 millimeters across.

What Do Huckleberries Taste Like? Do Huckleberries Taste Good?

Huckleberries visually echo the blueberries, while their tastes are both similar, except huckleberries are tarter.

Their differentiating factor is the size of their seeds. The seeds of huckleberries are larger and bitter.

They are a lot harder to come around and thrive primarily in the wild, unlike the ever-available blueberries. 

According to the eleven Vaccinium species they belong to, you can call them wild berries.

They come in different colors such as red, blue, purple, and black. The red ones have more tartness while the rest are sweeter.

These berries of the Vaccinium genus also go by other common names like wortleberry, bilberry, and cranberry.

They are possibly the favorite wild berries for the Westerners, with seven Vaccinium species dwelling across Oregon State.

In terms of nutrition, they serve great as food and medicine, and the Northwest Tribes have been harvesting the huckleberries for centuries.

Being berries, they are high in antioxidants and Vitamin C. They help improve the immune system, and Vitamin C builds collagen to make your skin look younger.

If you are anemic, Huckleberries should be an ideal supplement for iron to improve blood circulation.

They also provide Potassium to maintain water balance in your body.

If you are a fitness freak, you may find it helpful to increase metabolism and enhance muscle tone.

They also help in preventing diabetes, cancer, and heart diseases. Find out the nutrition facts how much 100gm of huckleberries would give.

How to Eat Huckleberries?

Treat it like you would to any other berry. Make muffins, cobbler, or pie out of them, and their tart and fairly sweet taste will not disappoint you.

You can even incorporate huckleberries in savory dishes. Here’s Martha Stewart telling you how to concoct huckleberries into a savory dish with her Huckleberry Relish recipe.

You can preserve them in the form of jellies and jams.

When added with honey, huckleberries turn out to be unique and flavorful in taste.

You may include them in any meal by blending them into breakfast items like oats or salad on the side with your main course meals.

Then leaves of huckleberries infuse incredibly in your daily tea.

They contribute to flavor in soups, pudding, and pancakes.

Make a Brandy and Huckleberry sauce out of them to complement both your sweet and savory dishes.

You may even skip the conventional baking of cookies and muffins and whip those berries into these amazing recipes for dinner.

If you want to stash them away for later use, you can try freezing them. Begin by washing, drying, and placing Huckleberries on a cookie sheet.

Use a paper towel to cover them before putting them in the freezer. Seal the frozen berries in a container and into the freezer again for later use.

Conclusion

They are wild, small, and incredibly beneficial for health while being popular even in the kitchen.

The very name may remind you of cartoons and books or even in context to literature. 

Their modest size is a metaphor for pettiness, which led to Mark Twain naming a poor boy as ‘Huckleberry’ in Huckleberry Finn.

Well, call it humble, but these tiny little berries can give you a lot more than you can imagine.

When you see them, you can hear them saying, “I’m your huckleberry.”

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