What Does Beaver Taste Like? Does Beaver Taste Good?

Trying out new foods is always a good option. It will expand your palate.

It will also improve your nutrition compared to the food that you eat every day.

An excellent dish to try out is beaver meat. It is a perfect choice of meal for you.

It is a good source of protein, iron, and vitamin A. And the best part? It is delicious.

Eating beaver meat might sound a bit disagreeable, but we guarantee that it will be worth the taste.

In fact, beaver meat is similar to have a delightful taste like grass-fed beef. Why don’t you give it a try?

What is Beaver?

Beavers are large semi-aquatic rodents that thrive in the Northern Hemisphere.

They are the second-largest living rodents after the Capybaras. The United States and Canada are the primary consumers of beaver meat.

The liver and feet of beaver is the best portion to eat since it contains the highest amount of protein in the body.

The tail is also a popular choice to eat because of its unique medicinal properties.

Compared to other red meats, beaver meat has the highest content of calories and fats.

This high content of calories and fat is because the beavers remain plump even in winter.

What Does Beaver Taste Like? Does Beaver Taste Good?

Beaver meat’s taste is gamey. For those who eat beaver meat, they match the taste similar to that of pork.

People who eat beaver meat claim that the meat is lean, while others say it has the right amount of fat.

A beaver killed in spring tends to have less fat than a beaver killed in winter.

Be sure to eat a beaver in winter if you will try it out for the first time. That way, it will have a pleasant flavor when you eat it.

The tail of a beaver is also another portion that many people like to eat. It is because the tail contains the biggest source of fat in its body. 

People use the tail of a beaver for garnish in preparing other dishes because of its high-fat content.

The color of beaver meat is dark in color like rabbit meat. The taste is so mild that you can eat it even with salt.

The texture is a bit chewy that you might feel like you’re chewing on jerky.

Beaver also has a high nutritional value that it contains more Omega 3 than beef.

According to the Medical Centre, the University of Rochester, 1 pound of raw beaver meat provides around 100 grams of protein and more than 600 grams of energy to fill you up.

How to Cook Beaver Meat?

In case you catch a beaver, it does not take a lot of time to prepare. 

Louisiana-based cooking page Cajun Cooking Recipes advises their readers to soak fresh beaver meat overnight in salt water.

This way, you can remove all the unwanted blood from the meat.

You will find the castor glands in the lower abdominal cavity of the beaver.

You can freeze it and sell it to a trapper who will, in turn, sell it to make perfume ingredients out of it.

We recommend a fried beaver stew from the meat you caught or bought it. You can get the recipe here.

The cooking of a beaver tail is quite different. Chefs recommend cooking the beaver without the tail since it contains a lot of fat.

Meagan Wohlberg from The Northern Journal, Canada, advises that roasting the beaver tail on fire on a stick is one of the best and easiest ways to consume it.

The liver of a beaver usually contains a slightly high amount of heavy metal called cadmium. It is generally harmless but may prove a health problem to smokers.

You should consume less than 30 livers of beaver meat in a year if you are a smoker.

Please ensure that you catch or get the beaver meat from a dam or store you usually hunt or buy.

There is a high chance of contaminated beaver meat from toxic places that beavers prowl.

Eating contaminated beaver meat will result in health hazards for the body.

Conclusion

If you want to consume beaver meat after reading this, try it out. There is a big possibility that you will surely enjoy savoring this delicacy to your heart’s content.

There are not many people who tasted beaver and didn’t like it.

People prize eating beaver meat now so much that people consume it daily in the Southern parts of America, Europe, and Russia.

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